Table of contents


  1. CLIMATE CHANGE: Snapshot of wins and losses at the Doha talks
  2. CLIMATE CHANGE: In the twilight zone
  3. FOOD: How to feed the future
  4. HEALTH: How we live and die
  5. SOMALIA: Potential goldmine for fishermen as piracy declines


CLIMATE CHANGE: Snapshot of wins and losses at the Doha talks
JOHANNESBURG، 9/12/2012 (IRIN) - Like last year’s UN climate change talks, this year’s conference in Doha culminated in an all-night session to hammer out a deal on preventing further global warming and protecting people from the effects of climate change. While some promising compromises were made, the absence of a strong commitment to slash greenhouse gas emissions and help vulnerable populations adapt to climate change was evident in the conference’s 39 decisions. full report
CLIMATE CHANGE: In the twilight zone
DOHA، 11/12/2012 (IRIN) - Covering the UN climate change talks is, in many ways, a surreal experience. This year’s talks - the 18th Conference of the Parties (COP) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) - were held in Doha’s futuristic Qatar National Convention Centre. The front of the centre is propped up by structures shaped like huge tree trunks, and the inside is bathed in an eerie blue and green light, with a giant spider guarding the main foyer. The fact that you are always deprived of sleep during the marathon talks lends to the sense of otherworldliness. full report
FOOD: How to feed the future
LONDON، 12/12/2012 (IRIN) - Scientists anticipate there will be nine billion people in the world to feed by 2050. As this number rises, so will the earth’s temperature, which is expected to increase four degrees Celsius by the end of the century, wreaking havoc on the world’s food production. full report
HEALTH: How we live and die
LONDON، 14/12/2012 (IRIN) - We all know we are going to die, but how and when it happens depends largely on who we are and where we live. We think we know the major risks - perhaps malaria or AIDS-related diseases in Africa, or stroke, cancer and heart disease in North America and Western Europe. But, in fact, patterns of mortality and morbidity are rapidly changing around the world. full report
SOMALIA: Potential goldmine for fishermen as piracy declines
BERBERA، 14/12/2012 (IRIN) - Rusting hulks of capsized boats decorate the waters around Berbera, a port city in the self-declared republic of Somaliland. Further down Somalia’s coast, pirates raid freighters in the Gulf of Aden. Yet efforts are underway to help Somalis make better use of their 3,300km coastline. full report