Table of contents


  1. CONGO: Imports, corruption drive up food prices
  2. CLIMATE CHANGE: Underfunding leaves poor unable to adapt
  3. CLIMATE CHANGE: Natural disasters made history in 2011
  4. DRC: Civilian population in Masisi at risk
  5. In Brief: Uganda's Gulu goes green, with help from some cows
  6. DRC: Growing humanitarian needs in Goma
  7. SOUTH SUDAN: Getting healthcare to hard-to-reach areas
  8. CLIMATE CHANGE: Migration not always a way to adapt
  9. CLIMATE CHANGE: When adaptation does not work
  10. UGANDA: Increasing support to survivors of sexual assault
  11. SECURITY: Landmine casualty rate dropping
  12. FOOD: Decoding food security
  13. In Brief: One-stop site for climate change & food facts
  14. HEALTH: Predicting the next zoonotic pandemic
  15. DRC: Humanitarian Barbara Shenstone on the cost of the Goma crisis


CONGO: Imports, corruption drive up food prices
BRAZZAVILLE، 26/11/2012 (IRIN) - The Republic of Congo, which imports over US$240 million worth of food a year, has seen sharply rising staple food and fuel prices since the beginning of 2012, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and a local consumer rights body. full report
CLIMATE CHANGE: Underfunding leaves poor unable to adapt
JOHANNESBURG، 26/11/2012 (IRIN) - As the UN climate change talks get underway in Doha on 26 November, a series of new papers is highlighting unresolved issues and raising questions about the quality and quantity of aid being made available to help poor countries adapt to a warming earth. full report
CLIMATE CHANGE: Natural disasters made history in 2011
JOHANNESBURG، 27/11/2012 (IRIN) - Many of the worst natural disasters of 2011 were also the most severe the affected countries had ever experienced, revealed the Global Climate Risk Index (CRI) 2013, which was released in Doha on 27 November. full report
DRC: Civilian population in Masisi at risk
GOMA، 27/11/2012 (IRIN) - As Masisi, a lush territory in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), finds itself surrounded by military elements and mounting conflict, humanitarian agencies grow increasingly concerned about its civilian population. full report
In Brief: Uganda's Gulu goes green, with help from some cows
KAMPALA، 27/11/2012 (IRIN) - As traditional sources of energy, such as paraffin and wood fuel, grow more expensive, smallholders in northern Uganda’s Gulu are embracing biogas - a renewable energy source produced from organic waste - to cook and to light up their homes. full report
DRC: Growing humanitarian needs in Goma
GOMA، 28/11/2012 (IRIN) - When clashes broke out on 22 November between the M23 rebels and government-allied Mai Mai militias in the town of Sake, near the Democratic Republic of Congo's (DRC) border with Rwanda, 6,000 people fled down a dead-end road to Nzulo Village on the edge of Lake Kivu. By the following day, they were once again living in a war; M23 soldiers had arrived and were forcing the young men to help them build their camp on a nearby hilltop. full report
SOUTH SUDAN: Getting healthcare to hard-to-reach areas
BOMA، 28/11/2012 (IRIN) - Decades of war and a lack of development have left a majority of South Sudan’s population without access to any form of healthcare, resulting in some of the world’s worst health indicators. In a country where only one in four people has access to medical facilities, virtually everyone qualifies as "hard to reach", and those attempting to expand healthcare access face daunting challenges. full report
CLIMATE CHANGE: Migration not always a way to adapt
JOHANNESBURG، 28/11/2012 (IRIN) - As the impact of climate change unfolds, many have predicted forbidding scenarios of millions of impoverished people flooding into often affluent countries. Yet a ground-breaking study released on 28 November reveals a more nuanced relationship between climate variability and migration, which could provide insight into how events might transpire in the coming years. full report
CLIMATE CHANGE: When adaptation does not work
JOHANNESBURG، 29/11/2012 (IRIN) - People in developing countries have been learning to adapt to increasing salinity, erratic rains and, in some instances, frequent flooding as the climate changes. But a new study has taken a closer look at some of these adaptation strategies and found that, past a certain threshold, they cease to work. full report
UGANDA: Increasing support to survivors of sexual assault
KAMPALA، 29/11/2012 (IRIN) - A new initiative in which qualified village nurses and clinical officers provide free medical examinations and counselling services to survivors of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) in Uganda could help to speed up the prosecution of such cases, say officials. full report
SECURITY: Landmine casualty rate dropping
JOHANNESBURG، 29/11/2012 (IRIN) - Amid the odd relapse, progress towards a world free of antipersonnel mines is inching forward. A decade ago, the weapon was responsible for at least 32 casualties daily; by 2011, the casualty rate had dropped to about 12 per day, the Landmine and Cluster Munitions Monitor (LCMM) said in its 2012 report, published on the 29 November. full report
FOOD: Decoding food security
JOHANNESBURG، 30/11/2012 (IRIN) - Most of the world consumes bread, the cost of which has spiralled this year thanks to climatic shocks, worsening food security for millions. But a significant scientific breakthrough could see the development of extreme-climate -tolerant and disease- resistant varieties of wheat much sooner than previously possible. full report
In Brief: One-stop site for climate change & food facts
JOHANNESBURG، 30/11/2012 (IRIN) - About one-third of food produced for human consumption gets lost or is wasted globally. This amounts to about 1.3 billion tons per year, the equivalent of six to 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions generated by human beings. This and many more quick facts on the links between agriculture and climate change can be found in a set of “Big Facts” released on 30 November by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security. full report
HEALTH: Predicting the next zoonotic pandemic
LONDON، 30/11/2012 (IRIN) - Chances are high the world’s next pandemic will be a disease originating in animals, like 60 percent of current documented human infectious diseases. Even after hundreds of thousands of human deaths from zoonoses (diseases transmitted from animals to humans), experts say there is still limited information about how zoonoses are spread or just how to predict the next outbreak. full report
DRC: Humanitarian Barbara Shenstone on the cost of the Goma crisis
KINSHASA، 30/11/2012 (IRIN) - The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) estimates that 140,000 people have been forced to flee battles taking place in and around the eastern city of Goma since November 15. full report