Table of contents


  1. AID POLICY: Resisting the mantra of resilience
  2. KENYA: Government issues flood warning
  3. BURUNDI-TANZANIA: A troubled homecoming
  4. FOOD: No more fertilizers but trees
  5. KENYA: Refugee relocation order sparks concern
  6. DRC: Continuing efforts to contain Ebola
  7. DRC: Tough bargaining with armed groups
  8. AFRICA: Promoting sustainable inorganic fertilizer use
  9. BURUNDI: Towards greater food security
  10. DRC: Doubts mount over Ugandan mediation
  11. EAST AFRICA: Sex workers need help too


AID POLICY: Resisting the mantra of resilience
LONDON، 15/10/2012 (IRIN) - Ten years ago, resilience was little spoken of within the aid community; now the word is everywhere. Donors are demanding it, NGOs are mainstreaming it, and publications are promoting it. Policy makers - from climatologists to social theorists - see in resilience a more holistic and lasting solution to the world’s problems. full report
KENYA: Government issues flood warning
NAIROBI، 15/10/2012 (IRIN) - The Kenyan government has issued an alert over possible flash floods in parts of the country following the start of the country’s October-to-December short rains, which may be exacerbated by possible mild-to-moderate El Niño conditions. full report
BURUNDI-TANZANIA: A troubled homecoming
BUJUMBURA، 15/10/2012 (IRIN) - The imminent return of more than 35,000 Burundians from Tanzania poses major logistical challenges to aid agencies and the densely populated country they fled amid civil war almost 20 years ago. The return could degenerate into a “humanitarian disaster” if they ignore a 31 December deadline to leave willingly and end up being deported en masse. full report
FOOD: No more fertilizers but trees
ADDIS ABABA، 16/10/2012 (IRIN) - To keep its mostly maize-growing small farms productive through cycles of drought, Malawi spends 60 percent of its agricultural budget subsidizing fertilizers. But the findings of a 12-year study, released today, suggest farmers in Malawi and elsewhere could increase yields consistently without applying fertilizers, using instead 'fertilizer trees'. full report
KENYA: Refugee relocation order sparks concern
ISIOLO، 17/10/2012 (IRIN) - Amid rising insecurity, a senior official in Kenya’s North Eastern Province has ordered all refugees and unregistered migrants from neighbouring Somalia to move to the under-resourced Dadaab refugee complex by 20 October or face forced relocation. full report
DRC: Continuing efforts to contain Ebola
NAIROBI، 17/10/2012 (IRIN) - An Ebola outbreak that has killed several people in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) appears to be slowing down, but health workers say there is a need for continued vigilance in order to contain the virus. full report
DRC: Tough bargaining with armed groups
KALEMBE، 18/10/2012 (IRIN) - A recent incident in the town of Kalembe, in the Democratic Republic of Congo's (DRC) North Kivu Province, highlighted the fluid ambiguity of the national army's troubled relationship with local militia groups in eastern Congo as it attempts to integrate them into its ranks. full report
AFRICA: Promoting sustainable inorganic fertilizer use
NAIROBI، 18/10/2012 (IRIN) - There is growing need to promote inorganic fertilizer use among smallholders to improve food production and food security, especially among the world’s poorest populations, but its use must be sustainable, experts say. full report
BURUNDI: Towards greater food security
BUJUMBURA، 19/10/2012 (IRIN) - Burundi, despite being potentially self-sufficient in food, has the highest level of hunger of all the 79 countries listed in the 2012 Global Hunger Index, published earlier this month by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Welthungerhilfe, and Concern Worldwide. full report
DRC: Doubts mount over Ugandan mediation
KAMPALA، 19/10/2012 (IRIN) - Uganda’s mediation to end the fighting in northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) between government troops and M23 “mutineers”, which has caused large-scale population displacement, has come into question. full report
EAST AFRICA: Sex workers need help too
NAIROBI، 19/10/2012 (IRIN) - In humanitarian emergencies impoverished women may turn to sex work as a way of feeding themselves and their families; without the usual health services and given the often low education of those involved, sex is frequently unprotected, exposing them and their clients to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. full report