Environment

The race to adapt

AFAR/JOHANNESBURG, 1 July 2014 (IRIN Global) - Momina Ali is a teenager in one of the toughest and hottest places on earth - Ethiopia’s Afar region where average annual temperatures hover around 35 degrees Celsius. Increasingly intermittent rainfall in her village, Anderkelo, means that every three or four days Momina takes a day off school to search for water. In future the chances are that Momina’s treks for water could take even longer, depending on how rising temperatures affect the rains around her village and hence its water table. full report

Coral reef restoration can save lives, livelihoods

KISUMU, 24 June 2014 (IRIN Africa) - A new report suggests that preserving and restoring coral reefs may be one of the cheapest and most effective ways to mitigate coastal erosion and flooding. full report

A fresh start for climate change refugees

BERHALE/JOHANNESBURG, 12 June 2014 (IRIN Global) - Firmly attached to her home region and long used to the harshness of her living conditions, Amina Aliyu would probably not see herself as a potential “climate change refugee”. But there is a strong probability that in 10 or 15 years the place where she lives will no longer be fit for human habitation and migration to another region, or even another country, will be the only option. full report

Sri Lanka offers lessons on how not to manage water

COLOMBO, 4 June 2014 (IRIN Asia) - Angry paddy farmers blocked major roads in the Minneriya and Girithale areas in Sri Lanka’s North Eastern Polonnaruwa region last month, complaining the government had not released enough water for their rice to grow; they claimed they had lost 50,000 hectares of crops, or 1.75 million kg. full report

Toxic poultry feed threatens Bangladesh's poor

DHAKA, 2 June 2014 (IRIN Asia) - Bangladesh's leather tanneries are notoriously filthy, exposing workers and neighbours to toxic chemicals. And recent studies show that poultry feed produced from industry scraps may also be putting the health of millions throughout the country at risk. full report

Genome breakthrough could help fight against sleeping sickness

KISUMU/NAIROBI, 28 May 2014 (IRIN Africa) - Scientists have welcomed the development of genome sequence data on the tsetse fly, the vector responsible for the transmission of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), commonly known as sleeping sickness. They say it could be instrumental in devising strategies to eradicate the fly and reduce deaths and the spread of other diseases associated with it. full report

SLIDESHOW: Lighting revolution in Sierra Leone

FREETOWN, 27 May 2014 (IRIN Africa) - In the face of inadequate provision of power by the Sierra Leonean government, companies are stepping in to provide solar electricity systems that ordinary Sierra Leoneans can afford. full report

Lebanon’s drought needs long-term solutions

BEIRUT, 23 May 2014 (IRIN Middle East) - Michel Achkar-Daoud is getting used to dry conditions on his farm near the eastern Lebanese town of Zahle, but says changing weather patterns mean it is probably time to get out of farming altogether. full report

Melding science and tradition to tackle climate change

KISUMU, 23 May 2014 (IRIN Africa) - In the latest of several partnerships between tradition and modern science aimed at improving resilience to climate change, pastoralists and meteorologists in Tanzania are working together to produce weather forecasts better suited to farmers. full report

Kenya can lead on climate change adaptation

KISUMU, 21 May 2014 (IRIN Africa) - Research on the effects of climate change on agricultural productivity and food security in Kenya shows that the country can be a leader in adaptation to a warmer climate. full report

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